AUD

Access to Care for People with Alcohol Use Disorder in France

Citation
Costa M, Marcellin F, Coste M, et al Access to care for people with alcohol use disorder in France: a mixed-method cross-sectional study protocol (ASIA) BMJ Open 2018;8:e024669. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2018-024669
Publication Date

Abstract

Introduction: Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is a major public health concern worldwide. In France, only 10% of people with AUD (PWAUD) receive medical care. General practitioners (GP) are one of the main entry points for AUD care.

The Hardest Hit: Addressing the Crisis in Alcohol Treatment Services

Published by
Alcohol Concern, Alcohol Research UK
Publication Date

This research, launched at the All Party Parliamentary Group on Alcohol Harm on 1 May 2018, warns that the alcohol treatment sector is in crisis. These services are entering into a cycle of disinvestment, staff depletion, and reduced capacity, and this is due to get worse; in 2020 ring-fenced public health funding will end, posing additional risk to the areas of highest need.

Vulnerability for Alcohol Use Disorder and Rate of Alcohol Consumption

Citation
Gowin, J.L.; Sloan, M.E.; Stangl, B.L.; Vatsalya, V.; and Ramchandani, V.A. Vulnerability for alcohol use disorder and rate of alcohol consumption. The American Journal of Psychiatry 174(11):1094–1101, 2017. PMID: 28774194
Publication Date

"Binge drinking" may be more prevalent in individuals with an increased vulnerability to alcohol use disorder (AUD) and could act as an early warning indicator.

The American Psychiatric Association Practice Guideline for the Pharmacological Treatment of Patients with Alcohol Use Disorder

Published by
American Psychiatric Association
Publication Date

Rationale

The goal of this guideline is to improve the quality of care and treatment outcomes for patients with alcohol use disorder (AUD), as defined by DSM-5 (American Psychiatric Association 2013).

More Treatments on Deck for Alcohol Use Disorder

Thirteen years have passed since the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) last approved a new medication to help the nation’s millions of people with alcohol use disorder (AUD) stop or moderate their drinking. Only 3 such formulations exist, and 1, disulfiram, dates to the Prohibition era. Known commercially as Antabuse and introduced in 1923, it makes people memorably ill if they ingest alcohol, but it doesn’t stop the cravings. The other 2, naltrexone and