naloxone

Treatment of Opioid Use Disorder in Canadian Psychosocial Addiction Programs: A National Survey of Policy, Attitudes, and Practice

Citation
Hodgins, D. C., Budd, M., Czukar, G., Dubreucq, S., Jackson, L. A., Rush, B., ... & Cameron Wild, T. (2022). Treatment of Opioid Use Disorder in Canadian Psychosocial Addiction Programs: A National Survey of Policy, Attitudes, and Practice. The Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, 07067437221082858.
Publication Date

Abstract

Objective

To describe current approaches in treatment of opioid use disorder (OUD) within Canadian psychosocial outpatient, day, and residential addiction treatment programs, with an emphasis on the use of opioid agonist therapy (OAT).

Method

An online census survey was conducted in English and French of Canadian psychosocial addiction treatment programs (N = 214).

An observational prospective cohort study of naloxone use at witnessed overdoses, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Ukraine

Citation
Dietze, P., Gerra, G., Poznyak, V., Campello, G., Kashino, W., Dzhonbekov, D., Kiriazova, T., Nikitin, D., Terlikbayeva, A., Krupchanka, D., & Busse, A. (2022). An observational prospective cohort study of naloxone use at witnessed overdoses, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Ukraine [Étude de cohorte prospective observationnelle sur l'usage de naloxone en cas d'overdose au Kazakhstan, au Kirghizistan, au Tadjikistan et en Ukraine]. Bulletin of the World Health Organization, 100(3), 187–195. https://doi.org/10.2471/BLT.21.286459
Publication Date

Abstract

Objective

To determine whether participation in the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and the World Health Organization’s (WHO) Stop Overdose Safely (S-O-S) take-home naloxone training project in Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Ukraine resulted in naloxone use at witnessed opioid overdoses.

Staff preferences towards electronic data collection from a national take-home naloxone program: a cross-sectional study

Citation
Ericson, Ø.B., Eide, D., Lobmaier, P. et al. Staff preferences towards electronic data collection from a national take-home naloxone program: a cross-sectional study. Subst Abuse Treat Prev Policy 17, 13 (2022). https://doi.org/10.1186/s13011-022-00440-y
Publication Date

In Norway, overdose mortality is over 260 per year, with opioids being implicated in the majority of cases. In 2014, the Norwegian government announced a government-funded nationwide overdose prevention initiative in response to the country's high overdose rates. A broad take-home naloxone (THN) program was one of the key treatments featured.

Staff preferences towards electronic data collection from a national take-home naloxone program: a cross-sectional study

Citation
Ericson, Ø.B., Eide, D., Lobmaier, P. et al. Staff preferences towards electronic data collection from a national take-home naloxone program: a cross-sectional study. Subst Abuse Treat Prev Policy 17, 13 (2022). https://doi.org/10.1186/s13011-022-00440-y
Publication Date

Abstract

Background

During the scaling-up of a national Norwegian take-home naloxone (THN) program, data collection methods shifted from paper-based to electronic. The aim of this study was to explore staff preferences towards the shift in data collection.

Take-Home Naloxone and the Prevention of Deaths from Heroin Overdose

Citation
Strang, J. (2021). Take-Home Naloxone and the Prevention of Deaths from Heroin Overdose: Pursuing Strong Science, Fuller Understanding, Greater Impact. European Addiction Research, 1-15. Chicago

Naloxone is a drug that can reverse the effects of opioid drugs like heroin, methadone, opium, codeine, morphine and buprenorphine, and is an important aid in preventing drug-related deaths.

Overdose deaths are often witnessed and can be prevented by the people who are most likely to come into contact with someone using substances carrying naloxone kits.

This article explores 5 needs in the relation to take-home naloxone:

Overdose recognition and management: Reading list

Created by
ISSUP

According to the World Health Organisation, around half a million deaths each year are attributable to drug use. More than 70% of these deaths are related to opioids, with more than 30% of those deaths caused by overdose. Signs, symptoms, and management of an overdose differ depending on the situation and substance used. Below, is a list of research, publications, and tools on the subject of overdose recognition and management.

Evidence-Based Approaches to Opioid Overdose Recognition and Management: Share the Facts – Save Lives

Publication Date
To mark International Overdose Awareness Day on 31st of August 2021, the International Society of Substance Use Professionals (ISSUP), in collaboration with the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and the World Health Organization, presented an online event profiling naloxone programmes as a pathway for improving outcomes in the treatment of opioid dependence, overdose reduction, and saving lives. 

Evidence-Based Approaches to Opioid Overdose Recognition and Management: Share the Facts – Save Lives

London,
To mark International Overdose Awareness Day on 31st of August 2021, the International Society of Substance Use Professionals (ISSUP), in collaboration with the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and the World Health Organization, will present an online event profiling naloxone programmes as a pathway for improving outcomes in the treatment of opioid dependence, overdose reduction, and saving lives. 

Take-home naloxone

Created by
EMCDDA

Opioid overdose deaths can be prevented through timely administration of naloxone, a potent opioid antagonist drug that rapidly reverses the effects of opioid analgesics by binding to the opioid receptors in the central nervous system.

Because of its effectiveness, naloxone is used by emergency personnel worldwide.