Alcohol and Cancer

The focus in this webinar is the links between alcohol and cancer and the forthcoming Europe Beating Cancer Plan.

Organisational Climate Underlies Innovation Adoption. Effectiveness Bank Alcohol Treatment Matrix Cell D4

ORGANISATIONAL CLIMATE UNDERLIES INNOVATION ADOPTION

Key studies on how treatment organisations affect implementation and effectiveness of psychosocial therapies. Starts with the contention from an influential research stable that “organizational climate underlies the entire process of innovation adoption,” and highlights the study which forcefully brought that home to US researchers. Then addresses three key issues:
- Is your service even ready to *attempt* to change?
- Change driven by money versus humanitarian mission; just as good for patients?
- The stultifying effect of high staff turnover and how to reduce it.

Click link below to view or paste it in to your web browser address box, being sure to enter the whole address:
https://findings.org.uk/PHP/dl.php?file=Matrix/Alcohol/D4.htm&format=open&s=ml

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One of 25 cells in the Alcohol Treatment Matrix mapping seminal and key research and guidance on alcohol brief interventions and treatment.

“Succinct, relevant reports leaving me with more hours in the week to work with clients ... invaluable to me. Matrices join everything up and deliver a kind of bottom line ... superb service.”
Dr Sandy Francis, lecturer, Action on Addiction and University of Bath; NHS psychological therapist and supervisor, England

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Sent by Drug and Alcohol Findings via a third-party mailing list to alert you to site updates and recent UK-relevant evaluations and reviews of drug/alcohol interventions. Matrix refresh funded by Alcohol Change UK. Findings is also supported by the Society for the Study of Addiction and advised by the National Addiction Centre.

WHO/Europe Factsheet: Policy Action Needed to Reduce Cancers Attributable to Alcohol Use

This fact sheet provides up-to-date information and guidance on the links between alcohol and a range of cancers, including some of the most common types, such as female breast cancer and colorectal cancer, for those involved in designing and implementing policies that affect public health.

It sets out policy options to reduce the alcohol-attributable cancer burden within the WHO European Region, making clear that there is strong evidence that the implementation of cost-effective alcohol control policies including pricing policies (or policies that increase the price of alcohol) will achieve this.

The fact sheet was launched as part of the European Awareness Week on Alcohol Related Harm, 2020.

English (PDF, 1.126 MB)

Français (PDF, 1.137 MB)

Pусский (PDF, 1.165 MB)

Awareness Week on Alcohol Related Harm

The 8th Awareness Week on Alcohol related Harm will be held from 16th to 20th November.

This year’s theme is: Alcohol & Cancer

The aim of the Awareness Week on Alcohol related Harm is to raise awareness among EU policymakers of the harms caused by alcohol, to increase awareness of the need to address alcohol-related harm in Europe and highlight the need to address it through an integrated approach to alcohol policy.

You can find a full list of events here.

Campaign Material

Follow and support AWARH’20 on social media: #awarh20

 

Managing the Talking Route to Recovery. Effectiveness Bank Alcohol Treatment Matrix Cell C4

MANAGING THE TALKING ROUTE TO RECOVERY

Key studies on managing and supervising psychosocial treatments for problem drinking. Starts with an essay from two leading researchers into these treatments, “bravely questioning what it’s all been for” when routine implementation has proved elusive. Highlights the study which found “leaders ... have a cascading impact on their staff in ways other than through mandate”, then addresses two key issues:
- Workshop training has limited effects - so is ‘coaching’ the right model for producing good counsellors and therapists?
- Find out then reveal to the counsellors how their clients are really doing – effective workforce development tactic.

Click link below to view or paste it in to your web browser address box, being sure to enter the whole address:
https://findings.org.uk/PHP/dl.php?file=Matrix/Alcohol/C4.htm&format=open&s=ml

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One of 25 cells in the Alcohol Treatment Matrix mapping seminal and key research and guidance on alcohol brief interventions and treatment.

“Absolutely brilliant site and service which I use almost every day in my work (research, education and clinical practice). Recommend matrices to everyone! I use the website for my masters module at the university and the students love it!”

Dr Anne Whittaker, Senior Lecturer/Reader, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Care, Edinburgh Napier University, and Substance Misuse Directorate, NHS Lothian, Scotland

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Sent by Drug and Alcohol Findings via a third-party mailing list to alert you to site updates and recent UK-relevant evaluations and reviews of drug/alcohol interventions. Matrix refresh funded by Alcohol Change UK. Findings is also supported by the Society for the Study of Addiction and advised by the National Addiction Centre.

Is Reflective Listening All That’s Needed? Highlight from Effectiveness Bank Alcohol Treatment Matrix Cell B4

IS REFLECTIVE LISTENING ALL THAT’S NEEDED?

Just two alcohol treatment studies have tested Carl Rogers’ classic account of the “necessary and sufficient conditions” for effective therapy. Each stripped out motivational interviewing’s directive elements, leaving only ‘Rogerian’ empathic and reflective listening. Did the clients do just as well? If the iconoclastic Rogers who “doubted every authority including his own” had lived to find out, he might have felt his doubts only partly justified.

To go direct to the featured section click the link below or paste it in to your web browser address box, being sure to enter the whole address:

https://findings.org.uk/PHP/dl.php?file=Matrix/Alcohol/B4.htm&s=ml&format=open#issue1

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Drawn from cell B4 of the Alcohol Treatment Matrix, a workforce development resource mapping key research and guidance on alcohol brief interventions and treatment.

"Wow, outstanding work! This is one of the best, most clear and scholarly write ups I've seen of this complex topic."
Dr Lisa M. Najavits, Director of Treatment Innovations and adjunct professor, Massachusetts Medical School, USA, commenting on this cell

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Sent by Drug and Alcohol Findings via a third party mailing list to alert you to site updates and recent UK-relevant evaluations and reviews of drug/alcohol interventions. Refresh of the Alcohol Treatment Matrix is funded by Alcohol Change UK. Findings is also supported by the Society for the Study of Addiction, and advised by the National Addiction Centre.

The Talker in Talking Therapies. Effectiveness Bank Alcohol Treatment Matrix Cell B4

THE TALKER IN TALKING THERAPIES

Key studies on the impact of the practitioner in psychosocial therapies for alcohol dependence. Structured around Carl Rogers’ classic account of the “necessary and sufficient conditions” for effective therapy. Highlights the seminal alcohol study that validated empathy, understanding and warmth, and explores three key issues:
- Is Rogerian ‘sounding board’ listening really all that’s needed?
- Does being genuine entail contravening other Rogerian mandates?
- If therapists are influential, why don’t more studies register their effects?

Click link below to view or paste it in to your web browser address box, being sure to enter the whole address:
https://findings.org.uk/PHP/dl.php?file=Matrix/Alcohol/B4.htm&format=open&s=ml

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One of 25 cells in the Alcohol Treatment Matrix mapping seminal and key research and guidance on alcohol brief interventions and treatment.

“I am using your Matrices for all the medical students I am lecturing, guiding them there as the No. 1 resource they should go to on matters of drug and alcohol use ... So thanks for an unparalleled resource!”
Shaun Shelly, Addictions Division, University of Cape Town, South Africa

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Sent by Drug and Alcohol Findings via a third-party mailing list to alert you to site updates and recent UK-relevant evaluations and reviews of drug/alcohol interventions. Matrix refresh funded by Alcohol Change UK. Findings is also supported by the Society for the Study of Addiction and advised by the National Addiction Centre.

The Common Core of Effective Therapies. Highlight from Effectiveness Bank Alcohol Treatment Matrix Cell A4

THE COMMON CORE OF EFFECTIVE THERAPIES

Starting point in last week’s exploration of psychosocial therapies was 2018’s “impressively wise overview” of research on ‘common factors’ they share from a task force with the authority of the American Psychological Association. It was the third such project, the first of which in 1999 represented a turning point in a movement which dates back at least to 1936 and Saul Rosenzweig’s brief seminal paper, elaborated 25 years later by Jerome Frank into one of the most influential books on psychosocial therapy. Explore with us these landmarks and how they help explain unexpected findings from the two largest UK and US alcohol treatment trials.

To go direct to the featured section click the link below or paste it in to your web browser address box, being sure to enter the whole address:
https://findings.org.uk/PHP/dl.php?file=Matrix/Alcohol/A4.htm&s=ml&format=open#start

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Drawn from cell A4 of the Alcohol Treatment Matrix, a workforce development resource mapping key research and guidance on alcohol brief interventions and treatment.

“I remain astonished at your ability to integrate broad swathes of science in such an intelligent and concise fashion ... thank you for your indefatigable efforts to disseminate scientific findings to a broad audience; this field would have very little impact without translators such as yourself.”
Professor Keith Humphreys, Department of Psychiatry, Stanford University, USA

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Sent by Drug and Alcohol Findings via a third party mailing list to alert you to site updates and recent UK-relevant evaluations and reviews of drug/alcohol interventions. Refresh of the Alcohol Treatment Matrix is funded by Alcohol Change UK. Findings is also supported by the Society for the Study of Addiction, and advised by the National Addiction Centre.

The Talking Route to Recovery. Effectiveness Bank Alcohol Treatment Matrix Cell A4

THE TALKING ROUTE TO RECOVERY

Every treatment involves human interaction, but this cell is about therapies in which interaction is the intended active ingredient – ‘psychosocial’ therapies, the mainstay of alcohol dependence treatment. Starts with the American Psychological Association’s (APA) “impressively wise overview” of the features shared by effective therapies and highlights the £1.5 million UK trial of a new therapy; why were the researchers’ expectations confounded? Then asks whether therapy can make things worse, argues that guidance has been misled into advocating packaged interventions, and invites you to question the APA’s list of the most important things to do in therapy.

Click link below to view or paste it in to your web browser address box, being sure to enter the whole address:
https://findings.org.uk/PHP/dl.php?file=Matrix/Alcohol/A4.htm&format=open&s=ml

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One of 25 cells in the Alcohol Treatment Matrix mapping seminal and key research and guidance on alcohol brief interventions and treatment.

“I must admit I like the Matrix ... the database is phenomenal. I only wish that it was available in the ’80s and ’90s for my respective degrees; the hours of library time it could have saved! ... a tremendous piece of work, what a fantastic resource.”
Paul-John Griffiths, Independent Forensic Psychologist, UK

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Sent by Drug and Alcohol Findings to alert you to site updates and recent UK-relevant evaluations and reviews of drug/alcohol interventions. Matrix refresh funded by Alcohol Change UK. Findings is also supported by the Society for the Study of Addiction and advised by the National Addiction Centre.

‘It’s everywhere’ – alcohol’s public face and private harm

The Alcohol Health Alliance UK (AHA) is supporting the Commission on Alcohol Harm: An Inquiry into the Effects of Alcohol on Society.

The Commission was established to examine the current evidence on alcohol harm, recent trends in alcohol harm and the changes needed to reduce the harm caused by alcohol. 

The Commission examined the need for a new comprehensive alcohol strategy for England, which takes account of the strategies in place in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, and considers UK-wide priorities in areas where policy is not devolved. 

The publication is structured around the following headings:

  • Harm to those around the drinker
  • Harm to society
  • Harm to the individual 
  • Why we need a comprehensive strategy: “Nothing has really changed”

Treatment Systems Transcend Individual Services. Effectiveness Bank Alcohol Treatment Matrix Cell E3

TREATMENT SYSTEMS TRANSCEND INDIVIDUAL SERVICES

Online course on alcohol treatment research moves out to the level of whole treatment systems, highlighting the simple US innovation which routed detoxification recyclers into longer term remission, freeing up expensive resources. See if your vision of a ‘good’ service corresponds with that of an expert group. One criterion might be responding appropriately to mental illness; explore with us whether Britain is making progress on organising care at the substantial overlap between problem drinking and mental illness.

Click link below to view or paste it in to your web browser address box, being sure to enter the whole address:
https://findings.org.uk/PHP/dl.php?file=Matrix/Alcohol/E3.htm&format=open&s=ml

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One of 25 cells in the Alcohol Treatment Matrix mapping seminal and key research and guidance on alcohol brief interventions and treatment.

“Great overview of important treatment delivery fundamentals.”
Ireland Chapter of the International Nurses Society on Addictions

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Sent by Drug and Alcohol Findings to alert you to site updates and recent UK-relevant evaluations and reviews of drug/alcohol interventions. Matrix refresh funded by Alcohol Change UK. Findings is also supported by the Society for the Study of Addiction and advised by the National Addiction Centre.

COVID-19- Alcohol and Tobacco Policies in Africa

As the COVID-19 pandemic swept through the world, governments made crucial decisions in order to reduce the strain on health services experiencing extreme pressure.

One way that some governments chose to reduce this pressure, was to introduce measures to control alcohol-related harm.

Below are some of the ways the governments in Africa attempted to control levels of alcohol consumption during lockdown periods. 

Kenya

On the 27th of July, in response to a surge in coronavirus cases, the Kenyan government announced that “All bars shall remain closed until further notice. There shall be no sale of alcoholic beverages or drinks in eateries and restaurants”

Below are the new measures introduced: 

  • Alcoholic drinks shall not be sold to sit-in customers at restaurants, eateries, bars, food courts, entertainment joints, supermarkets, wines and liquor shops or in any business establishment.
  • Any business establishment that sells alcohol shall operate between 9.00 am and 7.30 pm.
  • A person shall not consume any alcoholic drink in a public place including a public park, restaurant, parking lot, eatery, bar, entertainment joint, Supermarkets or wines and spirits shop.
  • A fine of up to Sh20,000 or imprisonment for a period of maximum six months for those who violate the above provisions of the law.
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Read more on the Movendi website here.

South Africa

On the 12th of July, in a bid to reduce the volume of trauma patients so hospitals have more beds open to treat COVID-19 patients, President Cyril Ramaphosa reintroduced the alcohol ban.

South Africa originally introduced a ban on all alcohol sales in March. However, as lockdown restrictions were reviewed the ban was lifted.

According to President Cyril Ramaphosa, however, since the sale and distribution of alcohol was reintroduced in June, hospitals have experienced a spike in admissions in their trauma and emergency wards.

The South African government has faced pressure from the alcohol industry to relax the ban. The industry argues that the continuation of restrictions on alcohol sales will cause significant and long-lasting damage to the economy.

The tobacco ban was imposed under the 2002 Disaster Management Act, the government justifying it on health grounds based on advice from its medical experts as well as from the World Health Organization (WHO).

On the 15th of August, President Cyril Ramaphosa announced the coronavirus regulations would be eased and the government would end the ban on alcohol and tobacco sales.

Eswatini

In an attempt to reduce the spread of COVID-19, the Eswatini government suspended the wholesaling and distribution of alcohol from the 1st of July for a period of two months.

Prime Minister Ambrose Mandvulo Dlamini announced the new measures through a series of twitter posts.

Botswana

As part of the lockdown in response to the threat from Covid-19, Botswana's government banned the sale of alcohol and suspended all liquor licences in March.

A notice issued in the government gazette said the suspension was until further notice. All liquor stores will remain closed.

The reason given for the ban was that alcohol had "negative effects on adherence to Covid-19 protocols".

The ban was lifted on May 30, 2020, with the announcement from President Mokgweetsi Masisi, “as part of reopening the economy, the government has decided though in a controlled manner, to allow sale and consumption of alcoholic beverages, the details of which will be communicated by the Honourable Minister of Investment, Trade and Industry Ms Peggy Serame shortly”

On the 5th of August, however, the government reintroduced the ban on the sale of liquor.

Lesotho

On the 26th of March Lesotho announced a full lockdown including the closure of liquor businesses.

In May the government of Lesotho announced a loosening of restrictions. However, all premises were only allowed to operate on Mondays and Thursdays through takeaway services and limits on the amount of alcohol an induvial could purchase continued.

Zimbabwe

The sale of alcohol in retail outlets in Zimbabwe was introduced at the start of April in the wake of the 21-day national lockdown to reduce the spread of Covid-19.

Find out more here.

Namibia

The public possession and sale of alcohol were banned in the southwest African nation until June 1 when the current stage 2 lockdown was expected to come to an end.

Following the restrictions imposed by the government, the Namibian police reported an increase in alcohol smuggling and drug use.

The Treatment Organisation is the Healing Context. Effectiveness Bank Alcohol Treatment Matrix cell D3

THE TREATMENT ORGANISATION IS THE HEALING CONTEXT

We said that of the treatment of problem drinking in general, and it remains the case for specifically medical treatments. Cell D3 focuses on that context at the level of the treatment or healthcare organisation, drawing on seminal and key research to ask:
- Do higher quality primary care practices do better alcohol treatment, or is this an unrelated niche activity?
- Evidence-based innovation: always a good thing, or an outcome-eroding burden?
- Is alcohol treatment helped or hindered when medical care is part of the package? Research shows the answer is nuanced.

Click link below to view or paste it in to your web browser address box, being sure to enter the whole address:
https://findings.org.uk/PHP/dl.php?file=Matrix/Alcohol/D3.htm&format=open&s=ml

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One of 25 cells in the Alcohol Treatment Matrix mapping seminal and key research and guidance on alcohol brief interventions and treatment.

“A godsend for practitioners and commissioners. Dip in and take a look – the links are all there for you to benefit from the largest live drug and alcohol library in Britain.”
Claire Brown, Editor, Drink and Drugs News magazine, UK

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Sent by Drug and Alcohol Findings to alert you to site updates and recent UK-relevant evaluations and reviews of drug/alcohol interventions. Matrix refresh funded by Alcohol Change UK. Findings is also supported by the Society for the Study of Addiction and advised by the National Addiction Centre.

How Do You Identify Effective Clinicians? Highlight from Effectiveness Bank Alcohol Treatment Matrix cell C3

HOW DO YOU IDENTIFY EFFECTIVE CLINICIANS?

They differ greatly in how well their patients do, so how do we identify effective clinicians? In cell C3 the Alcohol Treatment Matrix tackled the critical missing link in improving treatment: recruitment. Research offers valuable clues, including brief written tests pioneered by a seminal US study whose findings were broadly replicated in Finland.

To go direct to the featured section click the link below or paste it in to your web browser address box, being sure to enter the whole address:

https://findings.org.uk/PHP/dl.php?f=Matrix/Alcohol/C3.htm&s=ml&format=open#issue2

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Drawn from cell C3 of the Alcohol Treatment Matrix, a resource mapping key research and guidance on alcohol brief interventions and treatment.

“When I first came into post completing sections of the alcohol and drug treatment matrices were part of my induction. They gave me a solid knowledge base and I have recommended them to others.”
Heather Wilson, Health Improvement Officer (Alcohol & Drugs), Aberdeen City Alcohol & Drug Partnership, Scotland

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Sent by Drug and Alcohol Findings to alert you to site updates and recent UK-relevant evaluations and reviews of drug/alcohol interventions. Refresh of the Alcohol Treatment Matrix is funded by Alcohol Change UK . Findings is also supported by the Society for the Study of Addiction, and advised by the National Addiction Centre.

Beer Drinking and Tax Levy in Botswana

According to the WHO, harmful alcohol use is one of the leading risk factors for the global burden of disease.

In response to concerning trends, governments around the world have intervened in the market for alcohol by levying specific taxes.  

In 2008, the government of Botswana imposed a 30% tax levy on all alcohol products to deal with problematic drinking in the country. The levy was initially set at 70% but was reduced to 30%.

Research into the effectiveness of these measures typically focusses on alcohol sales and self-reported levels of consumption. However, an area less understood is how members of society have responded to the interventions.

This study examined how beer drinkers in Botswana coped with the implementation of the new alcohol tax levy and its associated regulations.

The researcher adopted a constructivist approach, interviewing 20 members of the public who frequented the bars around the capital city, Gaborone.

Key Findings

  • Participants expressed frustration at the increase in alcohol prices, outlawed residential sales of alcohol, reduced hours of operation for bars and increased penalties for driving under the influence of alcohol, describing feeling like they were being treated like "small kids".
  • There was significant resistance, with participants stating that they would find a way of getting the alcohol regardless of the restrictions.
  • Some participants described the new shortened drinking hours leading to binge drinking.
  • Increased taxation has led to people sharing larger bottles of alcohol and being creative in finding ways to access alcohol.
  • Participants were forced to seek alternative ways to continue drinking, including going to shebeens that sell alcohol illegally.

The analysis highlights significant resistance from individuals in Botswana, with people seeking alternative ways of drinking when faced with restrictions. Instead of seeing the measures as a means of reducing disease, the participants felt it was an attack on their rights. Further research into the way alcohol policies are perceived will be necessary so the measures introduced have the intended effect.

The Sale of Alcohol in South Africa During the Coronavirus (Covid-19) Pandemic

On the 12th of July, in a bid to reduce the volume of trauma patients so hospitals have more beds open to treat COVID-19 patients, President Cyril Ramaphosa reintroduced the alcohol ban.

South Africa originally introduced a ban on all alcohol sales on 27 March. However, as lockdown restrictions were reviewed the ban was lifted.

According to President Cyril Ramaphosa, however, since the sale and distribution of alcohol was reintroduced in June, hospitals have experienced a spike in admissions in their trauma and emergency wards.

The South African government has faced pressure from the alcohol industry to relax the ban. The industry argues that the continuation of restrictions on alcohol sales will cause significant and long-lasting damage to the economy.

On the 15th of August, President Cyril Ramaphosa the coronavirus regulations would be eased and the government would end the ban on alcohol and tobacco sales. 

What Influences Pre-teens to Drink Alcohol?

Research has shown there to be a link between heavy drinking in youth and increased risky behaviour and reduced educational effectiveness.

In order to understand the factors that are associated with binge drinking in adolescence and young adulthood, it is important to understand the reasons why a young person has their initial drink.

This study, carried out by researchers from the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, investigates:

1. The link between parental and friends’ drinking with reported drinking among 11-year-olds 

2. The roles of perceptions of harm, expectancies towards alcohol, parental supervision and family relationships on drinking among 11-year-olds. 

The researchers analysed data gathered from the Millennium Cohort Study, which asked questions like:

Have you ever had an alcoholic drink? That is more than a few sips?

How much do you think people risk harming themselves if they drink one or two alcoholic drinks nearly every day?

On a scale of 1 to 7 where ‘1’ means completely happy and ‘7’ means not at all happy, how do you feel about your family?

Key findings

Cohort members whose mothers drank were more likely to drink 

Having friends who drank was strongly associated with cohort member drinking 

Young people were less likely to drink if they had a heightened perception of harm from 1–2 drinks daily, and negative expectancies towards alcohol.

Young people were more likely to drink if they had had positive expectancies towards alcohol; not being supervised on weekends and weekdays; frequent battles of will; and not being happy with family.

Overall 13.6 % of cohort members reported having drunk more than a few sips of an alcoholic drink. This highlights the importance of continued investigation into the reasons young people start drinking around this age whilst being mindful of cultural differences in attitudes towards drinking.

Making the Most of Medical Care. Effectiveness Bank Alcohol Treatment Matrix Cell C3

MAKING THE MOST OF MEDICAL CARE

Selected, explained and discussed – key research on management of medical interventions and treatment in medical settings. Highlights the remarkable transformation of a US clinic in the 1950s by an open-minded manager, whose overarching strategy was “placing the responsibility for achieving a therapeutic alliance on the caretaker rather than the patient”. Then addresses three key issues for managers:
- They differ greatly in how well their patients do – but how do you identify effective clinicians?
- Worth ‘stepping up’ to more intensive treatment if initial treatment fails, or just a waste of yet more resources?
- Mainly trial and error, or can research tell us which patients do best on which medication?

Click link below to view or paste it in to your web browser address box, being sure to enter the whole address:

https://findings.org.uk/PHP/dl.php?file=Matrix/Alcohol/C3.htm&format=open&s=ml

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One of 25 cells in the Alcohol Treatment Matrix mapping seminal and key research and guidance on alcohol brief interventions and treatment.

“The best one-stop site for all current research into a range of alcohol and drug issues. The treatment matrices are invaluable in terms of making most efficient use of time.”
John Thayers, Recovery and Quality Improvement Officer, Midlothian and East Lothian Drugs and Alcohol Partnership (MELDAP), Scotland

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Sent by Drug and Alcohol Findings to alert you to site updates and recent UK-relevant evaluations and reviews of drug/alcohol interventions. Matrix refresh funded by Alcohol Change UK. Findings is also supported by the Society for the Study of Addiction and advised by the National Addiction Centre.

Discussing Alcohol Use with the GP

A General Practitioner (GP) is often the first point of contact for people struggling with alcohol related issues. These doctors must be trained to detect problematic drinking as well as have the confidence and skills to have open conversations with patients. 

Feedback from patients who have received support from their GP helps inform guidance to having these conversations.

The aim of this qualitative study was to analyse the feelings of patients with Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD) who have  experienced screenings conducted by their GPs.

Through interviews, the researchers were keen to gain an understanding of the following:

  • perceptions of the excessive consumption of alcohol and AUD;

  • feelings regarding the care pathway for AUD;

  • experience with screening or diagnosis by GPs; and,

  • expectations regarding early screening for AUD.

Twelve patients participated in the study.

Themes that emerged following analysis included:

  • people felt shame, misunderstood and guilt around their drinking habits.
  • discussions around alcohol consumption tended to happen following a 'triggering' event
  • participants felt that GPs were often scared to broach the subject and were not trained to deal with the specific issue
  • The importance of the GP in accepting care could be fundamental
  • If the GP discussed alcohol use in an appropriate way, there could be an opportunity to enhance patient awareness
  • Often, talking with a GP was felt like a relief and helped the participants be more open with their friends and families.

Overall, this research emphasises the critical role GPs often have in helping people access appropriate support and open up about their difficulties. Acceptance and kindness are essential as the patients often described feeling judged and stigmatised. This feedback should be used to guide interventions and training for GPs who are working with people with AUD.

Hope and Beyond (HaB) Centre of Excellence for Addiction services REPORT 2017-2019

Since its formation in 2012, Hope and Beyond (HaB) has established herself as a pioneer organisation to combine treatment and research for Alcohol Use Disorders in Uganda.

The period between 2017 and 2019 was eventful and special for within this time; HaB was officially opened, conducted ground-breaking research and scaled up outreach and treatment services. In 2017, HaB launched community based services including; free treatment for Substance Use Disorders among low income populations, offering of community service and donations to the needy. The beneficiaries of our treatment services have now increased to a cumulative total of 495 clients of which 134 were registered in 2019 alone – the highest number of beneficiaries registered in one year. On the research front, we organised two addiction professionals’ workshops to valorise our findings; managed four peer reviewed publications and shared our results in local and international conferences. Among the products of our research is a special program to care for the psychological need of the children of our clients which we are now happy to share with other addiction treatment centres.