Age‐Varying Effects of Cannabis Use Frequency and Disorder on Symptoms of Psychosis, Depression and Anxiety in Adolescents and Adults

A recent study, published in the Journal of Addiction, has examined the association of cannabis use, cannabis use disorder and symptoms of psychosis, depression and anxiety in an adolescent and adult sample. The researchers also examined the differences in these associations and the onset of cannabis use and sex differences.

Highlights of results:

  • Cannabis use was associated with psychotic symptoms following age 22, with depressive symptoms from ages 16–19 and following age 25, but not with anxiety symptoms.
  • Cannabis Use Disorder was associated with psychotic symptoms following age 23 depressive symptoms at ages 19–20 and following age 25, and anxiety symptoms ages 26–27 only.
  • For adults, cannabis use was associated with mental health symptoms at most ages.
  • The results found a stronger association for females than males in young adulthood.

These results contribute to the body of research that has shown associations between cannabis use and increase the risk of mental health issues in adolescents and adult populations. It is essential that individuals are made aware of these links, so their decisions are appropriately informed.

Citation
Leadbeater, Bonnie J., Megan E. Ames, and Ashley N. Linden‐Carmichael. "Age‐varying effects of cannabis use frequency and disorder on symptoms of psychosis, depression and anxiety in adolescents and adults." Addiction 114, no. 2 (2019): 278-293.
Publication Date
Research Language

English

Country
Canada