alcohol

Alcohol Use in Times of the COVID-19 Virus

Citation
Rehm, J., Kilian, C., Ferreira‐Borges, C., Jernigan, D., Monteiro, M., Parry, C.D.H., Sanchez, Z.M. and Manthey, J. (2020), Alcohol use in times of the COVID 19: Implications for monitoring and policy. Drug Alcohol Rev.. doi:10.1111/dar.13074

During this global lockdown, most people have had to make major lifestyle changes in order to adhere to guidelines outlined by their respective governments.

The situation has forced people's behaviour and choices to change, and it is important to monitor these adjustments from a public health perspective.

Early Career Alcohol Research Symposium

Online,

In a time where many other research interactions have been halted, the Sheffield Alcohol Research Group is pleased to host a new annual symposium: the “Early Career Alcohol Research Symposium”. 

This two day symposium is aimed at UK-based early career researchers working in the field of alcohol research from both public health and social perspectives.

Drinking Patterns and the Distribution of Alcohol-Related Harms in Ireland: Evidence for the Prevention Paradox

Citation
O’Dwyer, C., Mongan, D., Millar, S.R. et al. Drinking patterns and the distribution of alcohol-related harms in Ireland: evidence for the prevention paradox. BMC Public Health 19, 1323 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-019-7666-4
Publication Date

Abstract

Background

According to the prevention paradox, the majority of alcohol-related harms in the population occur among low-to-moderate risk drinkers, simply because they are more numerous in the population, although high-risk drinkers have a higher individual risk of experiencing alcohol-related harms.

At the Crux: The Encounter between Clinician and Client. Effectiveness Bank Alcohol Treatment Matrix Cell B2

Published by
Drug and Alcohol Findings
Publication Date

AT THE CRUX: THE ENCOUNTER BETWEEN CLINICIAN AND CLIENT

Influences explored across the Matrix come to a head in the encounter between clinician and client. Take a step back and (in the words of one of this cell’s reviews) you will see that therapies may be the “trees”, but the “forest” is the client-therapist relationship.

Association of Prenatal Alcohol Exposure and Offspring Depression: A Negative Control Analysis of Maternal and Partner Consumption

Citation
Easey, K. E., Timpson, N. J., & Munafò, M. R. Association of Prenatal Alcohol Exposure and Offspring Depression: A Negative Control Analysis of Maternal and Partner Consumption. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.
Publication Date

Abstract

Background

Previous research has suggested that intrauterine alcohol exposure is associated with a variety of adverse outcomes in offspring. However, few studies have investigated its association with offspring internalizing disorders in late adolescence.