Alcoholics Anonymous

Self-Disclosure and the Treatment of Substance Abuse

Citation
Dilts, S. L., Clark, C. A., & Harmon, R. J. (1997). Self-disclosure and the treatment of substance abuse. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 14(1), 67–70. doi: 10.1016/s0740-5472(96)00191-2
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Abstract

The identification and treatment of the substance-abusing physician has led to outcome studies focusing on years of abstinence and resultant work performance, but little has been written addressing the therapeutic changes recovery brings in the personal lives of these physicians or in their approach to similarly addicted patients.

Combining Medically Assisted Treatment and Twelve-Step Programming: A Perspective and Review

Citation
Marc Galanter (2018) Combining medically assisted treatment and Twelve-Step programming: a perspective and review, The American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, 44:2, 151-159, DOI: 10.1080/00952990.2017.1306747
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ABSTRACT

Background: People with severe substance use disorders require long-term rehabilitative care after the initial treatment. There is, however, a deficit in the availability of such care. This may be due both to inadequate medical coverage and insufficient use of community-based Twelve-Step programs in many treatment facilities.

Does AA Really Help Drinkers Stop?

Citation
Estimating the efficacy of Alcoholics Anonymous without self-selection bias: an instrumental variables re-analysis of randomized clinical trials. Humphreys K., Blodgett J.C., Wagner T.H. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research: 2014, 38(11), p. 2688–2694.
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12-step fellowships offer a way to reconcile shrunken resources with the desire to get more patients safely out of treatment. Accounting for the self-selection bias which has obscured AA’s impacts, this synthesis of US trials finds that attending more meetings after treatment boosts abstinence. Why then is research equivocal on whether promoting attendance significantly improves drink-related outcomes?