Substance Use Disorder

High-dose buprenorphine induction in the emergency department for treatment of opioid use disorder

Citation
Herring AA, Vosooghi AA, Luftig J, et al. High-Dose Buprenorphine Induction in the Emergency Department for Treatment of Opioid Use Disorder. JAMA Netw Open. 2021;4(7):e2117128. doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2021.17128
Publication Date

In response to the rising efficacy of the illicit opioid drug supply and often observed delays in access to follow-up therapy, emergency departments (EDs) occasionally utilize a high-dose buprenorphine induction method for the treatment of opioid use disorder (OUD). The objective of this study is to investigate the safety and tolerability of high-dose (>12 mg) buprenorphine induction for patients with OUD presenting to an ED.

Variation in brief treatment for substance use disorder: a qualitative investigation of four federally qualified health centres with SBIRT services

Citation
Watson, D.P., Staton, M.D., Dennis, M.L. et al. Variation in brief treatment for substance use disorder: a qualitative investigation of four federally qualified health centers with SBIRT services. Subst Abuse Treat Prev Policy 16, 58 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1186/s13011-021-00381-y
Publication Date

Brief treatment (BT) or regular outpatient alcohol use or substance use disorder (SUD) treatment is a key element of the Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) model. It can be an effective, short-term, and low-cost treatment option for many people who misuse alcohol and drugs. Nevertheless, inconsistent BT implementation often costs similar to regular outpatient care.

Disentangling substance use and related problems: urgency predicts substance-related problems beyond the degree of use

Citation
Hildebrandt, M.K., Dieterich, R. & Endrass, T. Disentangling substance use and related problems: urgency predicts substance-related problems beyond the degree of use. BMC Psychiatry 21, 242 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12888-021-03240-z
Publication Date

Background:

Substance use disorders are reliably associated with high impulsivity and sensation seeking. Importantly, both precede problematic substance use, implicating them as risk factors. Individuals with substance use disorders show variable degrees of substance use (combined quantity and frequency) and substance-related problems and differ in both aspects from healthy controls.

Smoking among inpatients in treatment for substance use disorders: prevalence and effect on mental health and quality of life

Citation
Lien, L., Bolstad, I. & Bramness, J.G. Smoking among inpatients in treatment for substance use disorders: prevalence and effect on mental health and quality of life. BMC Psychiatry 21, 244 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12888-021-03252-9
Publication Date

Background:

Smoking is still prevalent among people with substance use disorders. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of smoking among patients in treatment for substance use disorders and to analyze the effect of smoking both at baseline and follow-up on drop-out, mental health and quality of life.

An Integrative Review of Measuring Caregiver Burden in Substance Use Disorder

Citation
Tyo, M. B., & McCurry, M. K. (2020). An integrative review of measuring caregiver burden in substance use disorder. Nursing Research, 69(5), 391-398.
Publication Date

Abstract

Background: Family caregivers contribute to engagement in treatment and adherence, reduced substance misuse and relapse, and increased well-being of recipients with substance use disorder. However, providing care has also been associated with negative emotional and physical health outcomes for caregivers.

Sex and Gender Effects in Recovery From Alcohol Use Disorder

Citation
Alcohol Research. 2020;40(3):03. https://doi.org/10.35946/arcr.v40.3.03
Publication Date

The current article provides a summary of biopsychosocial gender differences in alcohol use disorder (AUD), then reviews existing literature on gender differences in treatment access, retention, outcomes, and longer-term recovery. Among psychotherapies for AUD, there is support for the efficacy of providing female-specific treatment and for female-only treatment settings, but only when female-specific treatment is included.