opioids

Exploring Opioid Overdose Incidence in a Cohort of People Who Inject Drugs

Sydney, Australia,

Opioid overdose is a significant public health issue, with people who inject drugs (PWID) a key risk group. However, there is little contemporary information on opioid overdose incidence in Australia and limited evidence of the impact of factors affecting incidence among PWID. Further evidence on the risk and protective factors of an opioid overdose will help determine how to prevent these overdoses from occurring.

Opioid Use Disorder: A Nature Reviews Primer

Published by
Nature
Publication Date

Abstract | Opioid use disorder (OUD) is a chronic relapsing disorder that, whilst initially driven by activation of brain reward neurocircuits, increasingly engages anti-reward neurocircuits that drive adverse emotional states and relapse. However, successful recovery is possible with appropriate treatment, although with a persisting propensity to relapse.

Associations between National Development Indicators and the Age Profile of People who Inject Drugs: Results from a Global Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Published by
Lancet
Publication Date

Abstract: Background Globally, an estimated 15·6 million people inject drugs. We aimed to investigate global variation in the age profile of people who inject drugs (PWID), identify country-level factors associated with age of PWID, and assess the association between injecting drug use (IDU) in young people and rates of injecting and sexual risk behaviours at the country level.

The Emerging Role of Toxic Adulterants in Street Drugs in the US Illicit Opioid Crisis

Citation
DOI: 10.1177/0033354919887741 journals.sagepub.com/home/phr
Publication Date

This article introduces the emergence of adulterant cutting agents in street drugs in the United States and considers the synergistic effects that is compounding the opioids crisis in the U.S.  The article outlines the role of the Colombo Plan in pioneering identification of these substances around the world over the past years with support from the U.S.

Effect of Intranasal vs Intramuscular Naloxone on Opioid Overdose: A Randomized Clinical Trial

Citation
Dietze P, Jauncey M, Salmon A, et al. Effect of Intranasal vs Intramuscular Naloxone on Opioid Overdose: A Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA Netw Open. 2019;2(11):e1914977. doi:https://doi.org/10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2019.14977
Publication Date

Key Points

Question: Is 800 μg of naloxone hydrochloride administered intranasally as effective in reversing opioid overdose as the same dose administered intramuscularly?

Staff Perceptions of Prescription and Over-the-Counter Drug Dependence Services in England: A Qualitative Study

Citation
Coombes, H., Cooper, R.J. Staff perceptions of prescription and over-the-counter drug dependence services in England: a qualitative study. Addict Sci Clin Pract 14, 41 (2019) doi:10.1186/s13722-019-0170-4
Publication Date

Abstract

Background

Dependence to prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) drugs represents an increasing public health and clinical problem both in England and internationally. However, relatively little is known about those affected, particularly in relation to their management at drug dependence treatment centres.