substance use

Drug use severity in adolescence affects substance use disorder risk in adulthood

Citation
McCabe SE, Schulenberg JE, Schepis TS, McCabe VV, Veliz PT. Longitudinal Analysis of Substance Use Disorder Symptom Severity at Age 18 Years and Substance Use Disorder in Adulthood. JAMA Netw Open. 2022;5(4):e225324. doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2022.5324

Although more than 1 in every 3 US individuals will develop a substance use disorder in their lifetime, relatively little is known about the long-term patterns of substance use disorder symptoms from adolescence through adulthood.

Key Points

Question  What are the long-term patterns of substance use disorder symptoms from adolescence through adulthood?

The burden of mental disorders, substance use disorders and self-harm among young people in Europe

Citation
Castelpietra, G., Knudsen, A. K. S., Agardh, E. E., Armocida, B., Beghi, M., Iburg, K. M., ... & Monasta, L. (2022). The burden of mental disorders, substance use disorders and self-harm among young people in Europe, 1990–2019: findings from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2019. The Lancet Regional Health-Europe, 16, 100341.

Summary

Mental health is a public health issue for European young people. The Global Burden of Disease (GBD) Study 2019 provides internationally comparable information on trends in the health status of populations and changes in the leading causes of disease burden over time.

Sex Trafficking and Substance Use Identifying High-Priority Needs Within the Criminal Justice System

Published by
RAND

Substance use disorder (SUD) is common among victims of sex trafficking. Traffickers may exploit individuals' existing opioid use or other SUDs to coerce them into sex trafficking, or they may facilitate substance use to keep trafficking victims from exiting. Additionally, trafficking victims may use substances to cope with trauma.

European responses to the needs of people who experience homelessness and use drugs

Published by
EMCDDA

Summary:

This paper explores the evidence base for services designed to meet the needs of people who experience homelessness and use drugs. Through a delimited analysis of existing systematic and rapid evidence reviews, it considers the key lessons for the development of effective homelessness services in Europe.

Provision of peer support at the intersection of homelessness and problem substance use services

Citation
Miler, J.A., Carver, H., Foster, R. et al. Provision of peer support at the intersection of homelessness and problem substance use services: a systematic ‘state of the art’ review. BMC Public Health 20, 641 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-020-8407-4
Publication Date

People who experience homelessness are often described as hard to reach and face marginalisation and exclusion.Peer support, which refers to the support provided by people who have lived experiences of a particular situation, has been recognised as an important way of working with vulnerable groups who have quite often struggled to access and have been stigmatised within healthcare.

What treatment and services are effective for people who are homeless and use drugs?

Citation
Miler, J. A., Carver, H., Masterton, W., Parkes, T., Maden, M., Jones, L., & Sumnall, H. (2021). What treatment and services are effective for people who are homeless and use drugs? A systematic ‘review of reviews’. PloS one, 16(7), e0254729.
Publication Date

People who experience homelessness experience disproportionately high rates of drug use and associated harms, yet barriers to services and support are common. This review explores the effects of interventions for this population on substance use, housing, and related outcomes, as well as on treatment engagement, retention and successful completion.

What constitutes effective problematic substance use treatment from the perspective of people who are homeless?

Citation
Carver, H., Ring, N., Miler, J. et al. What constitutes effective problematic substance use treatment from the perspective of people who are homeless? A systematic review and meta-ethnography. Harm Reduct J 17, 10 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12954-020-0356-9

Despite people who are homeless experiencing higher rates of substance use, individuals face barriers when trying to access and engage with treatment services.

This systematic review and meta-ethnography explores the view of effective treatment by people who are homeless.

Twenty-three papers published since 2002 in the UK, USA and Canada were included in the review.

Key Findings:

SUAB Webinar: Homelessness and substance use - providing the best support

Online,

Presentation title: How can we ensure people experiencing problematic substance use and homelessness are provided with the best support?

Dr Hannah Carver, Lecturer in Substance Use/Co-Director of the Salvation Army Centre for Addiction Services and Research

Presentation title: Substance use trends amongst homeless and street-based populations